Archive

Quotes

The brain may be regarded as a kind of parasite of the organism, a pensioner, as it were, who dwells with the body.

—Arthur Schopenhauer, 1851

Understanding is a very dull occupation.

—Gertrude Stein, 1937

It is far, far better and much safer to have a firm anchor in nonsense than to put out on the troubled seas of thought.

—John Kenneth Galbraith, 1958

The sleep of reason produces monsters.

—Francisco Goya, 1799

What the brain does by itself is infinitely more fascinating and complex than any response it can make to chemical stimulation.

—Ursula K. Le Guin, 1971

Sanity is madness put to good uses; waking life is a dream controlled.

—George Santayana, 1920

Brain, n. An apparatus with which we think that we think.

—Ambrose Bierce, 1906

Your mind’s got to eat, too.

—Dambudzo Marechera, 1978

The most potent weapon in the hands of the oppressor is the mind of the oppressed.

—Steve Biko, 1971

A mind lively and at ease can do with seeing nothing, and can see nothing that does not answer.

—Jane Austen, 1815

Madness need not be all breakdown. It may also be breakthrough.

—R.D. Laing, 1967

The mind is not, I know, a highway but a temple, and its doors should not be carelessly left open.

—Margaret Fuller, 1844

In psychoanalysis nothing is true except the exaggerations.

—Theodor Adorno, 1951