Archive

Quotes

Give us the child for eight years and it will be a Bolshevist forever.

—Vladimir Lenin, 1923

The ceaseless, senseless demand for original scholarship in a number of fields, where only erudition is now possible, has led either to sheer irrelevancy, the famous knowing of more and more about less and less, or to the development of a pseudo-scholarship which actually destroys its object.

—Hannah Arendt, 1972

A school without grades must have been concocted by someone who was drunk on nonalcoholic wine.

—Karl Kraus, 1909

It is a greater advantage to be honestly educated than honorably born.

—Desiderius Erasmus, 1518

The period of a [Persian] boy’s education is between the ages of five and twenty, and he is taught three things only: to ride, to use the bow, and to speak the truth.

—Herodotus, c. 440 BC

Anyone who has a child should train him to be either a physicist or a ballet dancer. Then he’ll escape.

—W.H. Auden, 1947

Education has become a prisoner of contemporaneity. It is the past, not the dizzy present, that is the best door to the future.

—Camille Paglia, 1992

Anyone who has passed through the regular gradations of a classical education, and is not made a fool by it, may consider himself as having had a very narrow escape.

—William Hazlitt, 1821

Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe.

—H.G. Wells, 1920

It is not light that we need, but fire; it is not the gentle shower, but thunder. We need the storm, the whirlwind, and the earthquake.

—Frederick Douglass, 1852

All that we know is nothing can be known. 

—Lord Byron, 1812

I wonder whether if I had an education I should have been more or less a fool than I am. 

—Alice James, 1889

Knowledge is an ancient error reflecting on its youth. 

—Francis Picabia, 1949