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Quotes

The period of a [Persian] boy’s education is between the ages of five and twenty, and he is taught three things only: to ride, to use the bow, and to speak the truth.

—Herodotus, c. 440 BC

The ceaseless, senseless demand for original scholarship in a number of fields, where only erudition is now possible, has led either to sheer irrelevancy, the famous knowing of more and more about less and less, or to the development of a pseudo-scholarship which actually destroys its object.

—Hannah Arendt, 1972

Anyone who has passed through the regular gradations of a classical education, and is not made a fool by it, may consider himself as having had a very narrow escape.

—William Hazlitt, 1821

A fool’s brain digests philosophy into folly, science into superstition, and art into pedantry. Hence university education.

—George Bernard Shaw, 1903

Rewards and punishment are the lowest form of education.

—Zhuangzi, c. 286 BC

Real education must ultimately be limited to men who insist on knowing—the rest is mere sheep herding.

—Ezra Pound, 1934

Knowledge is an ancient error reflecting on its youth. 

—Francis Picabia, 1949

Repetition is the mother of education.

—Jean Paul Richter, 1807

In the first place God made idiots. This was for practice. Then he made school boards.

—Mark Twain, 1897

Education is a weapon whose effects depend on who holds it in his hands and at whom it is aimed.

—Joseph Stalin, 1934

Give us the child for eight years and it will be a Bolshevist forever.

—Vladimir Lenin, 1923

In large states public education will always be mediocre, for the same reason that in large kitchens the cooking is usually bad. 

—Friedrich Nietzsche, 1878

I wonder whether if I had an education I should have been more or less a fool than I am. 

—Alice James, 1889