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Quotes

Language is the house of being. In its home human beings dwell. Those who think and those who create with words are the guardians of this home.

—Martin Heidegger, 1949

Newspapers always excite curiosity. No one ever lays one down without a feeling of disappointment.

—Charles Lamb, 1833

Words pay no debts.

—William Shakespeare, 1601

Language ought to be the joint creation of poets and manual workers.

—George Orwell, 1944

I rather think the cinema will die. Look at the energy being exerted to revive it—yesterday it was color, today three dimensions. I don’t give it forty years more. Witness the decline of conversation. Only the Irish have remained incomparable conversationalists, maybe because technical progress has passed them by.

—Orson Welles, 1953

Unexemplary words and unfounded doctrines are avoided by the noble person. Why utter them?

—Dong Zhongshu, c. 120 BC

Every man is surrounded by a neighborhood of voluntary spies.

—Jane Austen, 1818

It is a luxury to be understood.

—Ralph Waldo Emerson, 1831

I have often repented speaking, but never of holding my tongue.

—Xenocrates, c. 350 BC

The only authors whom I acknowledge as American are the journalists. They indeed are not great writers, but they speak the language of their countrymen, and make themselves heard by them. 

—Alexis de Tocqueville, 1840

Under all speech that is good for anything, there lies a silence that is better. Silence is deep as eternity; speech is shallow as time.

—Thomas Carlyle, 1838

I am always sorry when any language is lost, because languages are the pedigrees of nations.

—Samuel Johnson, 1773

The newspaper is the natural enemy of the book, as the whore is of the decent woman.

—Edmond and Jules de Goncourt, 1858