Archive

Quotes

To safeguard one’s health at the cost of too strict a diet is a tiresome illness indeed.

—La Rochefoucauld, 1678

Cooking is the most massive rush. It’s like having the most amazing hard-on, with Viagra sprinkled on top of it, and it’s still there twelve hours later.

—Gordon Ramsey, 2003

It is not from the benevolence of the butcher, the brewer, or the baker that we expect our dinner, but from their regard for their own interest.

—Adam Smith, 1776

Feasts must be solemn and rare, or else they cease to be feasts. 

—Aldous Huxley, 1929

The belly is the reason why man does not mistake himself for a god.

—Friedrich Nietzsche, 1886

Why is not a rat as good as a rabbit? Why should men eat shrimps and neglect cockroaches?

—Henry Ward Beecher, 1862

Thank God for tea! What would the world do without tea? How did it exist? I am glad I was not born before tea.

—Sydney Smith, 1855

Thought depends absolutely on the stomach, but in spite of that, those who have the best stomachs are not the best thinkers.

—Voltaire, 1770

He makes his cook his merit, and the world visits his dinners and not him.

—Molière, 1666

One of the important requirements for learning how to cook is that you also learn how to eat.

—Julia Child, 2001

One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.

—Virginia Woolf, 1929

A great step toward independence is a good-humored stomach, one that is willing to endure rough treatment.

—Seneca the Younger, c. 60

Most vegetarians I ever saw looked enough like their food to be classed as cannibals.

—Finley Peter Dunne, 1900