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Quotes

Feasts must be solemn and rare, or else they cease to be feasts. 

—Aldous Huxley, 1929

When the stomach is full, it is easy to talk of fasting.

—St. Jerome, 395

I cannot but bless the memory of Julius Caesar, for the great esteem he expressed for fat men and his aversion to lean ones.

—David Hume, 1751

One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.

—Virginia Woolf, 1929

He makes his cook his merit, and the world visits his dinners and not him.

—Molière, 1666

To eat is to appropriate by destruction.

—Jean-Paul Sartre, 1943

One of the important requirements for learning how to cook is that you also learn how to eat.

—Julia Child, 2001

Most vegetarians I ever saw looked enough like their food to be classed as cannibals.

—Finley Peter Dunne, 1900

‘Tis a superstition to insist on a special diet. All is made at last of the same chemical atoms.

—Ralph Waldo Emerson, 1860

Thought depends absolutely on the stomach, but in spite of that, those who have the best stomachs are not the best thinkers.

—Voltaire, 1770

Why is not a rat as good as a rabbit? Why should men eat shrimps and neglect cockroaches?

—Henry Ward Beecher, 1862

To safeguard one’s health at the cost of too strict a diet is a tiresome illness indeed.

—La Rochefoucauld, 1678

For, say they, when cruising in an empty ship, if you can get nothing better out of the world, get a good dinner out of it, at least.

—Herman Melville, 1851