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Quotes

For, say they, when cruising in an empty ship, if you can get nothing better out of the world, get a good dinner out of it, at least.

—Herman Melville, 1851

Thought depends absolutely on the stomach, but in spite of that, those who have the best stomachs are not the best thinkers.

—Voltaire, 1770

Cooking is the most massive rush. It’s like having the most amazing hard-on, with Viagra sprinkled on top of it, and it’s still there twelve hours later.

—Gordon Ramsey, 2003

The belly is the reason why man does not mistake himself for a god.

—Friedrich Nietzsche, 1886

When the stomach is full, it is easy to talk of fasting.

—St. Jerome, 395

Why is not a rat as good as a rabbit? Why should men eat shrimps and neglect cockroaches?

—Henry Ward Beecher, 1862

What is food to one is to others bitter poison.

—Lucretius, 50 BC

Man is the only animal that can remain on friendly terms with the victims he intends to eat until he eats them. 

—Samuel Butler, 1912

Feasts must be solemn and rare, or else they cease to be feasts. 

—Aldous Huxley, 1929

A great step toward independence is a good-humored stomach, one that is willing to endure rough treatment.

—Seneca the Younger, c. 60

A woman should never be seen eating or drinking unless it be lobster salad and champagne, the only truly feminine and becoming viands.

—Lord Byron, 1812

He makes his cook his merit, and the world visits his dinners and not him.

—Molière, 1666

One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.

—Virginia Woolf, 1929