Archive

Quotes

Bad men live that they may eat and drink, whereas good men eat and drink that they may live.

—Socrates, c. 430 BC

The decline of the aperitif may well be one of the most depressing phenomena of our time.

—Luis Buñuel, 1983

To safeguard one’s health at the cost of too strict a diet is a tiresome illness indeed.

—La Rochefoucauld, 1678

Why is not a rat as good as a rabbit? Why should men eat shrimps and neglect cockroaches?

—Henry Ward Beecher, 1862

Man is the only animal that can remain on friendly terms with the victims he intends to eat until he eats them. 

—Samuel Butler, 1912

Thought depends absolutely on the stomach, but in spite of that, those who have the best stomachs are not the best thinkers.

—Voltaire, 1770

Cooking is the most massive rush. It’s like having the most amazing hard-on, with Viagra sprinkled on top of it, and it’s still there twelve hours later.

—Gordon Ramsey, 2003

To eat is to appropriate by destruction.

—Jean-Paul Sartre, 1943

I cannot but bless the memory of Julius Caesar, for the great esteem he expressed for fat men and his aversion to lean ones.

—David Hume, 1751

What is food to one is to others bitter poison.

—Lucretius, 50 BC

Whatsoever was the father of a disease, an ill diet was the mother.

—George Herbert, 1651

Thank God for tea! What would the world do without tea? How did it exist? I am glad I was not born before tea.

—Sydney Smith, 1855

At a dinner party one should eat wisely but not too well, and talk well but not too wisely.

—W. Somerset Maugham, 1896