Archive

Quotes

I cannot but bless the memory of Julius Caesar, for the great esteem he expressed for fat men and his aversion to lean ones.

—David Hume, 1751

‘Tis a superstition to insist on a special diet. All is made at last of the same chemical atoms.

—Ralph Waldo Emerson, 1860

Man is the only animal that can remain on friendly terms with the victims he intends to eat until he eats them. 

—Samuel Butler, 1912

At a dinner party one should eat wisely but not too well, and talk well but not too wisely.

—W. Somerset Maugham, 1896

Why is not a rat as good as a rabbit? Why should men eat shrimps and neglect cockroaches?

—Henry Ward Beecher, 1862

Feasts must be solemn and rare, or else they cease to be feasts. 

—Aldous Huxley, 1929

Most vegetarians I ever saw looked enough like their food to be classed as cannibals.

—Finley Peter Dunne, 1900

Whatsoever was the father of a disease, an ill diet was the mother.

—George Herbert, 1651

A great step toward independence is a good-humored stomach, one that is willing to endure rough treatment.

—Seneca the Younger, c. 60

He makes his cook his merit, and the world visits his dinners and not him.

—Molière, 1666

One of the important requirements for learning how to cook is that you also learn how to eat.

—Julia Child, 2001

Cooking is the most massive rush. It’s like having the most amazing hard-on, with Viagra sprinkled on top of it, and it’s still there twelve hours later.

—Gordon Ramsey, 2003

’Tis an ill cook that cannot lick his own fingers.

—William Shakespeare, c. 1595