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Quotes

I am sick and tired of publicity. I want no more of it. It puts me in a bad light. I just want to be forgotten.

—Al Capone, 1929

Possessions, outward success, publicity, luxury—to me these have always been contemptible. I believe that a simple and unassuming manner of life is best for everyone, best both for the body and the mind.

—Albert Einstein, 1931

I’m afraid of losing my obscurity. Genuineness only thrives in the dark. Like celery.

—Aldous Huxley, 1925

FAMOUS, adj. Conspicuously miserable.

—Ambrose Bierce, 1906

I would much rather have men ask why I have no statue than why I have one.

—Cato the Elder, c. 184 BC

And what will history say of me a thousand years hence?

—Marcus Tullius Cicero, 59 BC

We all have a contract with the public—in us they see themselves, or what they would like to be.

—Clark Gable, 1935

Worldly fame is but a breath of wind that blows now this way, now that, and changes names as it changes in direction.

—Dante Alighieri, c. 1315

Most authors seek fame, but I seek for justice—a holier impulse than ever entered into the ambitious struggles of the votaries of that fickle, flirting goddess.

—Davy Crockett, 1834

What is popularly called fame is nothing but an empty name and a legacy from paganism.

—Desiderius Erasmus, 1515

He who treats another human being as divine thereby assigns to himself the relative status of a child or an animal.

—E. R. Dodds, 1951

Happy is the man who hath never known what it is to taste of fame—to have it is a purgatory, to want it is a hell!

—Edward Bulwer-Lytton, 1843

Fame is but the empty noise of madmen.

—Epictetus, c. 100