Archive

Quotes

I’m afraid of losing my obscurity. Genuineness only thrives in the dark. Like celery.

—Aldous Huxley, 1925

He who treats another human being as divine thereby assigns to himself the relative status of a child or an animal.

—E. R. Dodds, 1951

Fame is no sanctuary from the passing of youth. Suicide is much easier and more acceptable in Hollywood than growing old gracefully.

—Julie Burchill, 1986

Men are generally more pleased with a widespread than with a great reputation.

—Pliny the Younger, c. 110

Now there is fame! Of all—hunger, misery, the incomprehension by the public—fame is by far the worst. It is the castigation by God of the artist. It is sad. It is true.

—Pablo Picasso, c. 1961

Fame will go by and, so long, I’ve had you, fame. If it goes by, I’ve always known it was fickle. So at least it’s something I experienced, but that’s not where I live.

—Marilyn Monroe, 1962

We all have a contract with the public—in us they see themselves, or what they would like to be.

—Clark Gable, 1935

There lurks in every human heart a desire of distinction which inclines every man first to hope and then to believe that nature has given him something peculiar to himself. 

—Samuel Johnson, 1763

There is only one thing in the world worse than being talked about, and that is not being talked about.

—Oscar Wilde, 1891

What a heavy burden is a name that has become too famous.

—Voltaire, 1723

They are trying to make me into a fixed star. I am an irregular planet.

—Martin Luther, c. 1530

Being a star has made it possible for me to get insulted in places where the average Negro could never hope to go and get insulted.

—Sammy Davis Jr., 1965

How sweet it is to have people point and say, “There he is.”

—Persius, c. 60