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Quotes

Men are generally more pleased with a widespread than with a great reputation.

—Pliny the Younger, c. 110

And what will history say of me a thousand years hence?

—Marcus Tullius Cicero, 59 BC

I would much rather have men ask why I have no statue than why I have one.

—Cato the Elder, c. 184 BC

Avoid the talk of men. For talk is mischievous, light, and easily raised, but hard to bear and difficult to be rid of. Talk never wholly dies away when many people voice her: even talk is in some ways divine.

—Hesiod, c. 700 BC

Reality is always the foe of famous names.

—Petrarch, 1337

Most authors seek fame, but I seek for justice—a holier impulse than ever entered into the ambitious struggles of the votaries of that fickle, flirting goddess.

—Davy Crockett, 1834

How sweet it is to have people point and say, “There he is.”

—Persius, c. 60

Fame is but the empty noise of madmen.

—Epictetus, c. 100

A woman’s greatest glory is to be little talked about by men, whether for good or ill.

—Pericles, c. 450 BC

Being a star has made it possible for me to get insulted in places where the average Negro could never hope to go and get insulted.

—Sammy Davis Jr., 1965

If fame is only to come after death, I am in no hurry for it.

—Martial, c. 86

I’m afraid of losing my obscurity. Genuineness only thrives in the dark. Like celery.

—Aldous Huxley, 1925

Famous, adj. Conspicuously miserable.

—Ambrose Bierce, 1906