Archive

Quotes

Keep running after a dog, and he will never bite you.

—François Rabelais, 1535

Weaseling out of things is important to learn. It’s what separates us from the animals—except the weasel.

—The Simpsons, 1993

There are some who, if a cat accidentally comes into the room, though they neither see it nor are told of it, will presently be in a sweat and ready to die away.

—Increase Mather, 1684

Histories are more full of examples of the fidelity of dogs than of friends.

—Alexander Pope, 1709

Man is the only animal that can remain on friendly terms with the victims he intends to eat until he eats them.

—Samuel Butler, c. 1890

Man is no man, but a wolf, to a stranger.

—Plautus, c. 200 BC

I do not mean to call an elephant a vulgar animal, but if you think about him carefully, you will find that his nonvulgarity consists in such gentleness as is possible to elephantine nature—not in his insensitive hide, nor in his clumsy foot, but in the way he will lift his foot if a child lies in his way; and in his sensitive trunk, and still more sensitive mind, and capability of pique on points of honor.

—John Ruskin, 1860

Be a good animal, true to your animal instincts.

—D.H. Lawrence, 1911

It is remarkable that only small birds properly sing.

—Charles Darwin, 1871

Animals have these advantages over man: they never hear the clock strike, they die without any idea of death, they have no theologians to instruct them, their last moments are not disturbed by unwelcome and unpleasant ceremonies, their funerals cost them nothing, and no one starts lawsuits over their wills.

—Voltaire, 1769

Who hears the fishes when they cry?

—Henry David Thoreau, 1849

Animals are such agreeable friends—they ask no questions, they pass no criticisms.

—George Eliot, 1857

When the eagles are silent, the parrots begin to jabber.

—Winston Churchill, 1945