Archive

Quotes

It is so difficult not to become vain about one’s own good luck.

—Simone de Beauvoir, 1963

Luck is not something you can mention in the presence of self-made men.

—E.B. White, 1944

Good or ill fortune is very little at our disposal.

—David Hume, 1742

One should always play fairly when one has the winning cards.

—Oscar Wilde, 1895

A self-made man is one who believes in luck and sends his son to Oxford.

—Christina Stead, 1938

’Tis not a ridiculous devotion to say a prayer before a game at tables?

—Thomas Browne, 1642

Luck, in the great game of war, is undoubtedly lord of all.

—Arthur Griffiths, 1899

Survivors look back and see omens, messages they missed.

—Joan Didion, 2005

There are two times in a man’s life when he should not speculate: when he can’t afford it, and when he can.

—Mark Twain, 1897

It is weak and silly to say you cannot bear what it is your fate to be required to bear. 

—Charlotte Brontë, 1847

Casting lots causes contentions to cease, and keeps the mighty apart.

—Book of Proverbs, c. 350 BC

Fortune resists half-hearted prayers. 

—Ovid, 8

To put one’s trust in God is only a longer way of saying that one will chance it.

—Samuel Butler, c. 1890