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Quotes

There never is absolute birth nor complete death, in the strict sense, consisting in the separation of the soul from the body. What we call births are developments and growths, while what we call deaths are envelopments and diminutions.

—Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, 1714

I looked and there was a pale green horse! Its rider’s name was Death, and Hades followed with him.

—Book of Revelations, c. 90

Is this dying? Is this all? Is this all that I feared when I prayed against a hard death? Oh, I can bear this! I can bear it!

—Cotton Mather, 1728

It is noble to die before doing anything that deserves death.

—Anaxandrides, c. 376

Whoever has died is freed from sin.

—St. Paul, c. 50

What is death? A scary mask. Take it off—see, it doesn’t bite.

—Epictetus, c. 110

I imagined it was more difficult to die. 

—Louis XIV, 1715

Epitaph, n. An inscription on a tomb, showing that virtues acquired by death have a retroactive effect.

—Ambrose Bierce, 1906

When a man dies, and his kin are glad of it, they say, “He is better off.”

—Edgar Watson Howe, 1911

I order that my funeral ceremonies be extremely modest, and that they take place at dawn or at the evening Ave Maria, without song or music.

—Giuseppe Verdi, 1900

We and the dead ride quick at night. 

—Gottfried August Bürger, 1773

You are dust, and to dust you shall return.

—Book of Genesis, c. 800 BC

Imagine a number of men in chains, all under sentence of death, some of whom are each day butchered in the sight of the others; those remaining see their own condition in that of their fellows and, looking at each other with grief and despair, await their turn. This is an image of the human condition.

—Blaise Pascal, 1669