Archive

Quotes

Labor disgraces no man; unfortunately, you occasionally find men who disgrace labor.

—Ulysses S. Grant, 1877

Eight hours for work, eight hours for sleep, eight hours for what we will.

—Slogan of the National Labor Union of the United States, 1866

I hate the present modes of living and getting a living. Farming and shopkeeping and working at a trade or profession are all odious to me. I should relish getting my living in a simple, primitive fashion.

—Henry David Thoreau, 1855

I like work; it fascinates me. I can sit and look at it for hours.

—Jerome K. Jerome, 1889

You can be up to your boobies in white satin, with gardenias in your hair and no sugar cane for miles, but you can still be working on a plantation.

—Billie Holiday, 1956

The workers are the saviors of society, the redeemers of the race.

—Eugene V. Debs, 1905

Plough deep while sluggards sleep.

—Benjamin Franklin, 1758

A man is not idle, because he is absorbed in thought. There is visible labor and there is an invisible labor.

—Victor Hugo, 1862

Hang work! I wish that all the year were holiday; I am sure that Indolence—indefeasible Indolence—is the true state of man.

—Charles Lamb, 1805

God sells us all things at the price of labor.

—Leonardo da Vinci, c. 1500

Every man is worth just so much as the things he busies himself with.

—Marcus Aurelius, c. 175

Man must be doing something, or fancy that he is doing something, for in him throbs the creative impulse; the mere basker in the sunshine is not a natural, but an abnormal man.

—Henry George, 1879

The most fitting occupation for a civilized man is to do nothing.

—Théophile Gautier, c. 1835