Archive

Quotes

At the bottom of enmity between strangers lies indifference.

—Søren Kierkegaard, 1850

There is no foreign land; it is the traveler only that is foreign.

—Robert Louis Stevenson, 1883

Do not do unto others as you would that they should do unto you. Their tastes may not be the same.

—George Bernard Shaw, 1903

By nature, men are nearly alike; by practice, they get to be wide apart.

—Confucius, c. 500 BC

Let the French but have England, and they won’t want to conquer it.

—Horace Walpole, 1745

Do not neglect to show hospitality to strangers, for by doing that some have entertained angels without knowing it.

—Hebrews, c. 60

We have really everything in common with America nowadays, except, of course, language.

—Oscar Wilde, 1887

In settling an island, the first building erected by a Spaniard will be a church, by a Frenchman a fort, by a Dutchman a warehouse, and by an Englishman an alehouse.

—Francis Grose, 1787

Nationalism is an infantile disease, the measles of mankind.

—Albert Einstein, 1929

When the missionaries first came to Africa they had the Bible and we had the land. They said, “Let us pray.” We closed our eyes. When we opened them, we had the Bible and they had the land.

—Desmond Tutu, 1984

All of life is a foreign country.

—Jack Kerouac, 1949

“Abroad,” that large home of ruined reputations.

—George Eliot, 1866

Once any group in society stands in a relatively deprived position in relation to other groups, it is genuinely deprived.

—Margaret Mead, 1972