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Quotes

Spoon feeding in the long run teaches us nothing but the shape of the spoon.

—E.M. Forster, 1951

Rewards and punishment are the lowest form of education.

—Zhuangzi, c. 286 BC

That which is evil is soon learned. 

—John Ray, 1670

A school without grades must have been concocted by someone who was drunk on nonalcoholic wine.

—Karl Kraus, 1909

My own experience is that a certain kind of genius among students is best brought out in bed.

—Allen Ginsberg, 1981

It is a greater advantage to be honestly educated than honorably born.

—Desiderius Erasmus, 1518

I wonder whether if I had an education I should have been more or less a fool than I am. 

—Alice James, 1889

Knowledge is an ancient error reflecting on its youth. 

—Francis Picabia, 1949

Anyone who has passed through the regular gradations of a classical education, and is not made a fool by it, may consider himself as having had a very narrow escape.

—William Hazlitt, 1821

A fool’s brain digests philosophy into folly, science into superstition, and art into pedantry. Hence university education.

—George Bernard Shaw, 1903

The desire of knowledge, like the thirst of riches, increases ever with the acquisition of it.

—Laurence Sterne, 1760

Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe.

—H.G. Wells, 1920

Give us the child for eight years and it will be a Bolshevist forever.

—Vladimir Lenin, 1923