Archive

Quotes

What a heavy burden is a name that has become too famous.

—Voltaire, 1723

Men are generally more pleased with a widespread than with a great reputation.

—Pliny the Younger, c. 110

Now there is fame! Of all—hunger, misery, the incomprehension by the public—fame is by far the worst. It is the castigation by God of the artist. It is sad. It is true.

—Pablo Picasso, c. 1961

He who treats another human being as divine thereby assigns to himself the relative status of a child or an animal.

—E. R. Dodds, 1951

If fame is only to come after death, I am in no hurry for it.

—Martial, c. 86

I won’t be happy till I’m as famous as God.

—Madonna, c. 1985

Most authors seek fame, but I seek for justice—a holier impulse than ever entered into the ambitious struggles of the votaries of that fickle, flirting goddess.

—Davy Crockett, 1834

Avoid the talk of men. For talk is mischievous, light, and easily raised, but hard to bear and difficult to be rid of. Talk never wholly dies away when many people voice her: even talk is in some ways divine.

—Hesiod, c. 700 BC

Happy is the man who hath never known what it is to taste of fame—to have it is a purgatory, to want it is a hell!

—Edward Bulwer-Lytton, 1843

They are trying to make me into a fixed star. I am an irregular planet.

—Martin Luther, c. 1530

Fame is no sanctuary from the passing of youth. Suicide is much easier and more acceptable in Hollywood than growing old gracefully.

—Julie Burchill, 1986

I would much rather have men ask why I have no statue than why I have one.

—Cato the Elder, c. 184 BC

I’m afraid of losing my obscurity. Genuineness only thrives in the dark. Like celery.

—Aldous Huxley, 1925