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Quotes

A great step toward independence is a good-humored stomach, one that is willing to endure rough treatment.

—Seneca the Younger, c. 60

At a dinner party one should eat wisely but not too well, and talk well but not too wisely.

—W. Somerset Maugham, 1896

Thought depends absolutely on the stomach, but in spite of that, those who have the best stomachs are not the best thinkers.

—Voltaire, 1770

The decline of the aperitif may well be one of the most depressing phenomena of our time.

—Luis Buñuel, 1983

I cannot but bless the memory of Julius Caesar, for the great esteem he expressed for fat men and his aversion to lean ones.

—David Hume, 1751

Thank God for tea! What would the world do without tea? How did it exist? I am glad I was not born before tea.

—Sydney Smith, 1855

Cooking is the most massive rush. It’s like having the most amazing hard-on, with Viagra sprinkled on top of it, and it’s still there twelve hours later.

—Gordon Ramsey, 2003

One of the important requirements for learning how to cook is that you also learn how to eat.

—Julia Child, 2001

No lyric poems live long or please many people which are written by drinkers of water.

—Horace, 20 BC

To safeguard one’s health at the cost of too strict a diet is a tiresome illness indeed.

—La Rochefoucauld, 1678

He makes his cook his merit, and the world visits his dinners and not him.

—Molière, 1666

The proof of the pudding is in the eating.

—Miguel de Cervantes, 1615

Whatsoever was the father of a disease, an ill diet was the mother.

—George Herbert, 1651