Archive

Quotes

Words pay no debts.

—William Shakespeare, 1601

Language is the house of being. In its home human beings dwell. Those who think and those who create with words are the guardians of this home.

—Martin Heidegger, 1949

In the case of news, we should always wait for the sacrament of confirmation.

—Voltaire, 1764

Speak and speed; the close mouth catches no flies.

—Benjamin Franklin, c. 1732

Language is the armory of the human mind and at once contains the trophies of its past and the weapons of its future conquests. 

—Samuel Taylor Coleridge, 1817

Methinks the human method of expression by sound of tongue is very elementary and ought to be substituted for some ingenious invention which should be able to give vent to at least six coherent sentences at once.

—Virginia Woolf, 1899

The chief merit of language is clearness, and we know that nothing detracts so much from this as do unfamiliar terms.

—Galen, c. 175

Making a film means, first of all, to tell a story. That story can be an improbable one, but it should never be banal. It must be dramatic and human. What is drama, after all, but life with the dull bits cut out?

—Alfred Hitchcock, 1962

It is difficult for a woman to define her feelings in language which is chiefly made by men to express theirs.

—Thomas Hardy, 1874

Language is the archives of history.

—Ralph Waldo Emerson, 1844

Do not the most moving moments of our lives find us all without words?

—Marcel Marceau, 1958

Language ought to be the joint creation of poets and manual workers.

—George Orwell, 1944

Anyone who doesn’t know foreign languages knows nothing of his own.

—Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, 1821