Archive

Quotes

He may be a patriot for Austria, but the question is whether he is a patriot for me.

—Emperor Francis Joseph, c. 1850

The more corrupt the republic, the more numerous the laws.

—Tacitus, c. 117

Television has made dictatorship impossible, but democracy unbearable.

—Shimon Peres, 1995

I say violence is necessary. It is as American as cherry pie.

—H. Rap Brown, 1967

Do that which consists in taking no action, and order will prevail.

—Laozi, c. 500 BC

A government which robs Peter to pay Paul can always count on the support of Paul.

—George Bernard Shaw, 1944

On the loftiest throne in the world, we still sit only on our own rump.

—Michel de Montaigne, 1580

To be turned from one’s course by men’s opinions, by blame, and by misrepresentation shows a man unfit to hold office.

—Quintus Fabius Maximus, c. 203 BC

I am no courtesan, nor moderator, nor tribune, nor defender of the people: I am myself the people.

—Maximilien de Robespierre, 1792

If you must take care that your opinions do not differ in the least from those of the person with whom you are talking, you might just as well be alone.

—Yoshida Kenko, c. 1330

The affairs of the world are no more than so much trickery, and a man who toils for money or honor or whatever else in deference to the wishes of others, rather than because his own desire or needs lead him to do so, will always be a fool.

—Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, 1774

It is impossible to tell which of the two dispositions we find in men is more harmful in a republic, that which seeks to maintain an established position or that which has none but seeks to acquire it.

—Niccolò Machiavelli, c. 1515

An appeal to the reason of the people has never been known to fail in the long run.

—James Russell Lowell, c. 1865