c. 1950 | New York City

Edmund Wilson Regrets

Killing a few birds with one stone.

EDMUND WILSON REGRETS THAT IT IS IMPOSSIBLE FOR HIM TO:

Read Manuscripts,

Write Articles or Books to Order,

Write Forewords or Introductions,

Make Statements for Publicity Purposes,

Do Any Kind of Editorial Work,

Judge Literary Contests,

Give Interviews,

Conduct Educational Courses,

Deliver Lectures,

Give Talks or Make Speeches,

Broadcast or Appear on Television,

Take Part in Writer’s Congresses,

Answer Questionnaires,

Contribute to or Take Part in Symposiums or “Panels” of Any Kind,

Contribute Manuscripts for Sales,

Donate Copies of His Books to Libraries,

Autograph Books for Strangers,

Allow His Name to Be Used on Letterheads,

Supply Personal Information About Himself,

Supply Photographs of Himself,

Supply Opinions on Literary or Other Subjects.

Contributor

Edmund Wilson

A form letter. Wilson worked as the managing editor of Vanity Fair and as an associate editor at The New Republic before publishing The Triple Thinkers in 1938, To the Finland Station in 1940, and The Wound and the Bow in 1941. The critic and essayist was married to Mary McCarthy, his third wife, from 1938 to 1946. After F. Scott Fitzgerald died, Wilson edited his college friend’s incomplete final novel The Last Tycoon, published in 1941.