Roundtable

The Rest Is History

Impulse buys, early modern toilets, and a fishy fad.

By Caroline Wazer

Friday, June 22, 2018

Stonehenge (Moonlight), by Yoshijiro Urushibara (Mokuchu), twentieth century. Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, California State Library loan.

Stonehenge (Moonlight), by Yoshijiro Urushibara (Mokuchu), twentieth century. Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, California State Library loan.

• Though he’d planned to bid on chairs, a barrister named Cecil Chubb walked away from a 1915 auction the new owner of Stonehenge: “I thought a Salisbury man ought to buy it, and that is how it was done.” (The Telegraph)

• The Paradise, the Wild, the Ruin, the Living Culture, or the Playground? Tourism scholars recognize five main types of summer vacation, each with its own complex history. (JSTOR Daily)

• Appalachian history written in (and by) the land. (Places Journal)

• Approved spellings from the New York Times’ 1928 stylebook included “aeronaut,” “calibre,” “fungous” for the adjective but “fungus” for the noun, “theatre,” and “unforgetable.” (Columbia Journalism Review)

• Archaeologists find evidence of seventeenth-century Danish diets—and parasites—inside two “poo-filled time capsules.” (Cosmos)

• One word: castration. (The Paris Review Daily)

• Charleston, South Carolina, apologizes for its role in American slavery: “At the very least, we can say we’re sorry.” (NPR)

• “A sort of aquatic peaceable kingdom”: the home aquarium as Victorian fad. (Public Domain Review)

• Does truth have an address? (Aeon)

• This week in obituaries: the Oxford scholar who rescued the philosophical reputations of Seneca and Cicero, a gentleman bank robber, and the hip-hop pioneer who rapped, “History is distorted ’cause it ain’t all there, so let’s examine the truth so we can clear the air.”