Roundtable

The Rest Is History

Ancient badminton, fishing, and imperialist ducks.

By Jaime Fuller

Friday, June 07, 2019

Suffrage demonstration to get the last vote in the Senate before June 4, 1919. Photograph by Harris & Ewing. Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

Suffrage demonstration in Washington, DC, to get the last vote in the U.S. Senate before June 4, 1919, the date of the Nineteenth Amendment’s passage in Congress. Photograph by Harris & Ewing. Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

• On Peruvian “ceremonial badminton.” (Archaeology)

• Revisiting How to Read Donald Duck: Imperialist Ideology in the Disney Comic. (NewYorker.com)

• Looking back on a very consequential weather forecast. (JSTOR Daily)

• Plans for the African Burial Ground memorial in Harlem are moving forward. (The City)

• Breaking news on the Justinian Plague. (Medievalists.net)

• “Early farmers liked alcohol so much they invented two ways to brew it.” (New Scientist)

• Queer art fifty years after Stonewall: “I liked seeing the representations of ourselves so openly. We had always been in the picture, but in the post-Stonewall era, unabashedly so.” (Artsy)

• Remembering Jeannette Rankin on the centennial of the Nineteenth Amendment’s passage in Congress. (Library of Congress Blog)

• A newly translated article from a Yiddish newspaper sets the scene as women vote for the first time in 1918 New York. (Jewish Currents)

• The history of GALS, the Great Angling Lesbian Society. (Autostraddle)

• D-Day in photographs: “Beyond the cinematic reenactments of noise and chaos and bloodletting, it is hard for subsequent generations raised on Europe’s expectations of peace—or, at the most, on the menace of the Cold War—to imagine how a truly hot war might have been.” (New York Times)

• This week in obituaries: a Creole chef, a Swedish writer, a psychiatrist who gave soldiers LSDa sports columnist,  a singer, a librarian, and a jazz drummer.