By nature, men are nearly alike; by practice, they get to be wide apart.

—Confucius, c. 500 BC

This is not a clash between civilizations. It is a clash about civilization.

—Tony Blair, 2006

When you name yourself, you always name another.

—Bertolt Brecht, 1926

I want to be the white man’s brother, not his brother-in-law.

—Martin Luther King Jr., 1962

Nationalism is an infantile disease, the measles of mankind.

—Albert Einstein, 1929

It’s good to remember that in crises, natural crises, human beings forget for a while their ignorances, their biases, their prejudices. For a little while, neighbors help neighbors and strangers help strangers.

—Maya Angelou, 2011

Many need no other provocation to enmity than that they find themselves excelled.

—Samuel Johnson, 1751

“Abroad,” that large home of ruined reputations.

—George Eliot, 1866

The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there.

—L. P. Hartley, 1953

All of life is a foreign country.

—Jack Kerouac, 1949

Let the French but have England, and they won’t want to conquer it.

—Horace Walpole, 1745

The conquest of the earth, which mostly means the taking it away from those who have a different complexion or slightly flatter noses than ourselves, is not a pretty thing when you look into it too much.

—Joseph Conrad, 1899

If a man be gracious and courteous to strangers, it shows he is a citizen of the world, and that his heart is no island cut off from other lands, but a continent that joins to them.

—Francis Bacon, 1625

No man has any natural authority over his fellow man.

—Jean-Jacques Rousseau, 1762

I am a man: I consider nothing human alien to me.

—Terence, 163 BC

Such then is the human state, that to wish greatness for one’s country is to wish harm to one’s neighbors.

—Voltaire, 1764

In settling an island, the first building erected by a Spaniard will be a church, by a Frenchman a fort, by a Dutchman a warehouse, and by an Englishman an alehouse.

—Francis Grose, 1787

There are chance meetings with strangers that interest us from the first moment, before a word is spoken.

—Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1866

Other nations use “force”; we Britons alone use “might.”

—Evelyn Waugh, 1938

The almost insoluble task is to let neither the power of others, nor our own powerlessness, stupefy us.

—Theodor Adorno, 1951

Do not do unto others as you would that they should do unto you. Their tastes may not be the same.

—George Bernard Shaw, 1903

Nothing is more narrow-minded than chauvinism or racial hatred. To me all men are equal; there are flatheads everywhere and I despise them all equally.

—Karl Kraus, 1909

We have really everything in common with America nowadays, except, of course, language.

—Oscar Wilde, 1887

No nation is fit to sit in judgment upon any other nation.

—Woodrow Wilson, 1915

Once any group in society stands in a relatively deprived position in relation to other groups, it is genuinely deprived.

—Margaret Mead, 1972

Who sees all beings in his own self, and his own self in all beings, loses all fear.

—The Upanishads, c. 800 BC

At the bottom of enmity between strangers lies indifference.

—Søren Kierkegaard, 1850

France has neither winter, summer, nor morals—apart from these drawbacks it is a fine country.

—Mark Twain, 1879

When the missionaries first came to Africa they had the Bible and we had the land. They said, “Let us pray.” We closed our eyes. When we opened them, we had the Bible and they had the land.

—Desmond Tutu, 1984

Strangers are an endangered species.

—Adrienne Rich, 1980

I have said this before, but I shall say it again and again and again: your boys are not going to be sent into any foreign wars.

—Franklin D. Roosevelt, 1940

If you wish to avoid foreign collision, you had better abandon the ocean.

—Henry Clay, 1812

A criminal may improve and become a decent member of society. A foreigner cannot improve. Once a foreigner, always a foreigner. There is no way out for him.

—George Mikes, 1946

Some of us would be greatly astonished to learn the reasons why others respect us.

—Marquis de Vauvenargues, 1746

The misfortune of the man of color is having been enslaved. The misfortune and inhumanity of the white man are having killed man somewhere.

—Frantz Fanon, 1952

Patriotism is an ephemeral motive that scarcely ever outlasts the particular threat to society that aroused it.

—Denis Diderot, 1774

To need to dominate others is to need others. The commander is dependent.

—Fernando Pessoa, c. 1935

There is no foreign land; it is the traveler only that is foreign.

—Robert Louis Stevenson, 1883

Your worst enemy cannot harm you as much as your own thoughts, unguarded.

—The Dhammapada, c. 400 BC

Do not neglect to show hospitality to strangers, for by doing that some have entertained angels without knowing it.

—Hebrews, c. 60

All men naturally hate each other. We have used concupiscence as best we can to make it serve the common good, but this is mere sham and a false image of charity, for essentially it is just hate.

—Blaise Pascal, c. 1655

Intolerance is evidence of impotence.

—Aleister Crowley, c. 1925

One of the most time-consuming things is to have an enemy.

—E.B. White, 1958

To think ill of mankind, and not wish ill to them, is perhaps the highest wisdom and virtue.

—William Hazlitt, 1823

Of troubles none is greater than to be robbed of one’s native land.

—Euripides, 431 BC

Our enemies are innovative and resourceful, and so are we. They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people, and neither do we.

—George W. Bush, 2004

The noblest kind of retribution is not to become like your enemy.

—Marcus Aurelius, c. 175

Children are all foreigners. We treat them as such.

—Ralph Waldo Emerson, 1839

Africa has her mysteries, and even a wise man cannot understand them. But a wise man respects them.

—Miriam Makeba, 1988

The less intelligent the white man is, the more stupid he thinks the black.

—André Gide, 1927

I do desire we may be better strangers.

—William Shakespeare, 1600