When the eagles are silent, the parrots begin to jabber.

—Winston Churchill, 1945

Animals are good to think with.

—Claude Lévi-Strauss, 1962

Cows are among the gentlest of breathing creatures; none show more passionate tenderness to their young when deprived of them—and, in short, I am not ashamed to profess a deep love for these quiet creatures.

—Thomas De Quincey, 1821

In every man is a wild beast; most of them don’t know how to hold it back, and the majority give it full rein when they are not restrained by terror of law.

—Frederick the Great, 1759

The righteous know the needs of their animals, but the mercy of the wicked is cruel.

—Book of Proverbs, c. 500 BC

Imitate the ass in his love to his master.

—St. John Chrysostom, c. 388

There are some who, if a cat accidentally comes into the room, though they neither see it nor are told of it, will presently be in a sweat and ready to die away.

—Increase Mather, 1684

I do not mean to call an elephant a vulgar animal, but if you think about him carefully, you will find that his nonvulgarity consists in such gentleness as is possible to elephantine nature—not in his insensitive hide, nor in his clumsy foot, but in the way he will lift his foot if a child lies in his way; and in his sensitive trunk, and still more sensitive mind, and capability of pique on points of honor.

—John Ruskin, 1860

Man is a noble animal, splendid in ashes and pompous in the grave.

—Thomas Browne, 1658

Be a good animal, true to your animal instincts.

—D.H. Lawrence, 1911

Man is the only animal for whom his own existence is a problem which he has to solve and from which he cannot escape.

—Erich Fromm, 1947

Animals, in their generation, are wiser than the sons of men, but their wisdom is confined to a few particulars, and lies in a very narrow compass.

—Joseph Addison, 1711

A dog starved at his master’s gate

Predicts the ruin of the state.

—William Blake, 1807

Alas! We are ridiculous animals.

—Horace Walpole, 1777

I hate the sight of monkeys; they remind me so of poor relations.

—Henry Luttrell, 1820

An ape will be an ape, though clad in purple.

—Desiderius Erasmus, 1511

One of the animals which a generous and sociable man would soonest become is a dog. A dog can have a friend; he has affections and character; he can enjoy equally the field and the fireside; he dreams, he caresses, he propitiates; he offends and is pardoned; he stands by you in adversity; he is a good fellow.

—Leigh Hunt, 1834

Every creature in the world is like a book and a picture, to us, and a mirror.

—Alain de Lille, c. 1200

A good dog, sir, deserves a good bone.

—Ben Jonson, 1633

We call them dumb animals, and so they are, for they cannot tell us how they feel, but they do not suffer less because they have no words.

—Anna Sewell, 1877

Keep running after a dog, and he will never bite you.

—François Rabelais, 1535

Man and animals are really the conduit of food, the sepulcher of animals, and resting place of the dead, one causing the death of the other, making themselves the covering for the corruption of other dead bodies.

—Leonardo da Vinci, c. 1500

Do you not see how God is praised by those in the heavens and those on earth? The very birds praised Him as they wing their way.

—The Qur’an, c. 620

Animals are such agreeable friends—they ask no questions, they pass no criticisms.

—George Eliot, 1857

Who hears the fishes when they cry?

—Henry David Thoreau, 1849

Happiness is a warm puppy.

—Charles Schulz, 1971

If you are a dog and your owner suggests that you wear a sweater, suggest that he wear a tail.

—Fran Lebowitz, 1981

It is remarkable that only small birds properly sing.

—Charles Darwin, 1871

Go to the ant, you lazybones; consider its ways, and be wise.

—Book of Proverbs, c. 350 BC

The fox knows lots of tricks, the hedgehog only one—but it’s a winner.

—Archilochus, c. 650 BC

Man is the only animal that laughs and weeps, for he is the only animal that is struck with the difference between what things are and what they ought to be.

—William Hazlitt, 1819

Man is no man, but a wolf, to a stranger.

—Plautus , c. 200 BC

Man, when perfected, is the best of animals, but when separated from law and justice, he is the worst of all. 

—Aristotle, c. 350 BC

Weaseling out of things is important to learn. It’s what separates us from the animals—except the weasel.

—The Simpsons, 1993

What delight can there be, and not rather displeasure, in hearing the barking and howling of dogs? Or what greater pleasure is there to be felt when a dog followeth a hare than when a dog followeth a dog?

—Thomas More, 1516

From the oyster to the eagle, from the pig to the tiger, all animals exist in man, and each one of them is in a man. Sometimes even several of them at a time. Animals are nothing else than the figures of our virtues and our vices, straying before our eyes, the visible phantoms of our souls. God shows them to us in order to induce us to reflect.

—Victor Hugo, 1862

How like to us is that filthy beast the ape.

—Cicero, 45 BC

Every ass thinks himself worthy to stand with the king’s horses.

—Gnomologia, 1732

Men, my dear, are very queer animals—a mixture of horse nervousness, ass stubbornness, and camel malice.

—T. H. Huxley, 1895

A bull contents himself with one meadow, and one forest is enough for a thousand elephants; but the little body of a man devours more than all other living creatures.

—Seneca the Younger, c. 64

Animals have these advantages over man: they never hear the clock strike, they die without any idea of death, they have no theologians to instruct them, their last moments are not disturbed by unwelcome and unpleasant ceremonies, their funerals cost them nothing, and no one starts lawsuits over their wills.

—Voltaire, 1769

Histories are more full of examples of the fidelity of dogs than of friends.

—Alexander Pope, 1709

There be beasts that, at a year old, observe more, and pursue that which is for their good more prudently, than a child can do at ten.

—Thomas Hobbes, 1651

Who sleepeth with dogs shall rise with fleas.

—John Florio, 1578

Man is a troublesome animal and therefore is not very manageable.

—Plato, c. 349 BC

Man is merely a more perfect animal than the rest. He reasons better.

—Napoleon Bonaparte, 1816

Man is the only animal that can remain on friendly terms with the victims he intends to eat until he eats them.

—Samuel Butler, c. 1890

The elephant, although a gross beast, is yet the most decent and most sensible of any other upon earth. Although he never changes his female, and hath so tender a love for her whom he hath chosen, yet he never couples with her but at the end of every three years, and then only for the space of five days.

—St. Francis de Sales, 1609

Animals are in possession of themselves; their soul is in possession of their body. But they have no right to their life, because they do not will it. 

—Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, 1821

Life is no way to treat an animal.

—Kurt Vonnegut, 2005

Of all the creatures that breathe and creep on the surface of the earth, none is more to be pitied than man.

—Homer, c. 750 BC