If a man will observe as he walks the streets, I believe he will find the merriest countenances in mourning coaches.

—Jonathan Swift, 1706

Bereavement is a darkness impenetrable to the imagination of the unbereaved.

—Iris Murdoch, 1974

It is noble to die before doing anything that deserves death.

—Anaxandrides, c. 376

The play is the tragedy “Man,” And its hero the conqueror worm.

—Edgar Allan Poe, 1843

You are dust, and to dust you shall return.

—Book of Genesis, c. 800 BC

There never is absolute birth nor complete death, in the strict sense, consisting in the separation of the soul from the body. What we call births are developments and growths, while what we call deaths are envelopments and diminutions.

—Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, 1714

If a parricide is more wicked than anyone who commits homicide—because he kills not merely a man but a near relative—without doubt worse still is he who kills himself, because there is none nearer to a man than himself. 

—Saint Augustine, c. 420

I think it makes small difference to the dead if they are buried in the tokens of luxury. All this is an empty glorification left for those who live.

—Euripides, 415 BC

I looked and there was a pale green horse! Its rider’s name was Death, and Hades followed with him.

—Book of Revelations, c. 90

Nobody, sir, dies willingly.

—Antiphanes, c. 370 BC

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