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Quotes

Academe, n. An ancient school where morality and philosophy were taught.

Academy, n. (from academe) A modern school where football is taught.

- Ambrose Bierce, 1906

I never yet could make out why men are so fond of hunting; they often hurt themselves, often spoil good horses, and tear up the fields—and all for a hare or a fox or a stag that they could get more easily some other way.

- Anna Sewell, 1877

Though the boys throw stones at frogs in sport, yet the frogs do not die in sport but in earnest.

- Bion of Smyrna, c. 100 BC

These useless men ought to be cut up and served at a banquet. I really believe that athletes have less intelligence than swine.

- Dion Chrysostom, c. 95

The true mission of American sports is to prepare young men for war.

- Dwight D. Eisenhower, c. 1952

A win always seems shallow: it is the loss that is so profound and suggests nasty infinities.

- E.M. Forster, 1919

We cannot say what the woman might be physically, if the girl were not allowed all the freedom of the boy in romping, climbing, swimming, playing whoop and ball.

- Elizabeth Cady Stanton, 1848

Serious sport has nothing to do with fair play. It is bound up with hatred, jealousy, boastfulness, disregard of all rules, and sadistic pleasure in witnessing violence; in other words it is war minus the shooting.

- George Orwell, 1945

Gambling is the child of avarice, the brother of iniquity, and the father of mischief.

- George Washington, 1783

The sadness of the end of a career of an older athlete, with the betrayal of his body, is mirrored in the rest of us. Consciously or not, we know: there, soon, go I.

- Ira Berkow, 1987

If I lose at play, I blaspheme, and if my fellow loses, he blasphemes. So that God is always sure to be the loser.

- John Donne, 1623

Play, wherein persons of condition, especially ladies, waste so much of their time, is a plain instance to me that men cannot be perfectly idle; they must be doing something, for how else could they sit so many hours toiling at that which generally gives more vexation than delight to people whilst they are actually engaged in it?

- John Locke, 1693

One great reason why many children abandon themselves wholly to silly sports and trifle away all their time insipidly is because they have found their curiosity baulked and their inquiries neglected.

- John Locke, 1693